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Antiques Roadshow: How Much Is it Worth?


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#151

bellN

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Posted Mar 7, 2012 @ 8:48 AM

It was from the British version of Antiques Roadshow that I learned the distinction between insurance value, auction value, and retail value. The British experts seem to give the insurance value of the heirloom most often, where the American experts give the auction value. That says a lot about their assumptions about their audience.
Since I no longer get cable (more than 3 years, and I haven't missed it yet) I'm stuck with watching the American PBS version.
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#152

InnerCanuck

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Posted Mar 12, 2012 @ 2:26 PM

Thoroughly enjoying Ovation's week-daily showing of ARUK. Record the episodes at 5 & 6 AM Pacific and FF through the commercials. Bad edits sometimes so the FFing has to be gentle! Have already seen a couple of items we've seen on the Priceless Antiques Roadshow clip shows which one of our local PBS stations (ex-KTEH, now part of the KQED behemoth) runs on Saturday nights. When they're not tin-cupping, that is...

Had purchased the February issue of Architectural Digest with the Prince of Wales on the cover - lovely photos and story on the saving of Dumfries House. It was a terrific surprise to see the furniture and house "live" and the caretaker showing the wonderful breakfast table with John Bly was a delight.
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#153

Raphael delGado

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Posted Mar 28, 2012 @ 6:16 AM

The rhinoceros horn cups! Oh, my! They are the items that were valued the highest I've ever seen on the Roadshow.

One rhinoceros horn cup just sold for over 300,000 to a bidder in Shanghai. I wonder if this one belonged to that man on AR?
rhinoceros horn cup auction
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#154

BoDiva

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Posted Mar 29, 2012 @ 9:19 PM

The auction value is usually the lowest. If someone other than the end user is buying, there needs to be room for markup to cover the cost of doing business. I think that's the most realistic value to give. An insurance value for something, no matter how inflated, is pretty useless if it is a one-of-a-kind object.
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#155

ILNative

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Posted Mar 30, 2012 @ 1:05 PM

Thanks to InnerCanuck, I've been enjoying Series 32 of the Antiques Roadshow UK on Ovation. BBCAmerica stopped showing that series (and the show entirely) after the episodes done at Leeds Townhall, so I've gotten to see ones I've never seen, like Somerleyton Hall and Stanway House. I'm very excited. Thanks, InnerCanuck!
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#156

InnerCanuck

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Posted Mar 30, 2012 @ 7:13 PM

You're most welcome, ILNative! So glad I stumbled across it, then found others here had, too. Wonder how far back Ovation will be able to go - just the Fiona Bruce years, or back further?
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#157

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Posted Apr 1, 2012 @ 2:49 AM

Hey, everybody! I just got back today. They had an appraiser from the Antique Roadshow. It was the guy with the mustache that loves sports memorabilia. Well, anyway...the signed Isaac Asimov book from a 2nd Edition Paperback was worth only $25-$40. Not bad since I only paid 25 cents for it. My dad's painting: only $25. But the post-War(mid-late 40s) Polish tea plate set I paid at a garage sale for only $20 was worth between $300-$400. I was happy with that. Did anybody from the Antique Roadshow came to your town or something?
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#158

bellN

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Posted Jun 19, 2012 @ 8:37 AM

I watched something called Antiques Roadshow Vintage last night. It was originally shown in 1996 or 1997, which I guess qualifies as vintage. Lest anyone think they were simply watching a very old rerun, they updated the estimates on the various treasures. In the ensuing 15 years some items decreased in value, many stayed the same, and just a few rose any significant amount. The change in values added some interest, but what would really be interesting is to follow up on the items themselves, to see what happened to them.
The British series used to do compilation shows as well, but typically they were more about showcasing special objects, and less about the price.
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#159

PrincessLuceval

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Posted Jun 19, 2012 @ 4:32 PM

My sister and I are going to the Roadshow when it comes to Cincinnati in July. I'm looking forward to it!

And I saw that episode last night, too, bellN. I entertained myself with a picture of the sisters fighting over the Tiffany lamp in the parking lot as they left.
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#160

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Posted Jun 19, 2012 @ 4:35 PM

My sister and I are going to the Roadshow when it comes to Cincinnati in July. I'm looking forward to it!

I went back in 1999 in Des Moines. It was lots of fun. Wear comfortable shoes there is lots of standing in line! I applied to go again this summer to Corpus Christi but didn't get tickets. ) - ;

I saw that last night too. Sort of meh.
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#161

lu1wml

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Posted Jun 19, 2012 @ 6:25 PM

I went when it was in Baltimore in 1999. I brought a cheap, lightweight folding lawn chair, and passed it on to someone else when I was able to get in early. (A friend had a friend in the crew, and we had different tickets.)
The Keno brothers and other appraisers worked the line as they arrived, and the police went down the line and examined all firearms, just to make sure that they weren't loaded.
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#162

BoDiva

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Posted Jun 20, 2012 @ 5:33 PM

I have a friend who made it on that Baltimore episode in '99. Had an autographed first edition Edgar Allen Poe. That episode also had someone who was all excited about his object (I think it was a sword) and excited to be chosen to be on air, only to find it was a fake. He wasn't much pleased.
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#163

PrincessLuceval

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 2:38 PM

Well, I have to report on the Antiques Roadshow that my sister and I attended in Cincinnati. We got there and stood in line for about an hour, before we could get into the actual different areas set up. It was fun, because we talked to people in line and looked at their stuff. Once we were in where the different areas were, we stood in line again, depending on how long it was for each category. We had a couple of brushes with greatness, though - while in line, Leigh Keno came out to find the restroom, and crossed in front of us, and put his hand on my shoulder and asked if we were having fun. And then closer in where the filming was, we watched Mark L. Wahlberg while we were in line. And it just happened that the pause in our line was right where he was going to do another clip, so he came over to talk to us. He said he was going to chat, and not to look at the cameras, so we just joked around with him for a while. That was very fun!

The lithographs I had were only worth about $30, my sister's Jim Northrup autograph was about the same (appraised by Leila Dunbar!), but my great-grandma's opal ring was estimated at around $200. And my favorite jewelry guy was there, Kevin Zavian.

So all in all, it was very, very fun. I'd definitely try to go if it's coming to your area!
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#164

Mystery

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 4:09 PM

Thanks for the writeup! I hope they return to actual new episodes soon. I'm just deleting these "update" shows that my dvr keeps picking up as new.

I'd've had my eyes peeled for either of the Kenos!

Edited by Mystery, Jul 23, 2012 @ 4:10 PM.

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#165

PrincessLuceval

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 5:50 PM

Mystery, we were all joking around after Leigh Keno came through, that I wasn't going to shower my shoulder ever again where he touched it. :) Only he was there, not Leslie. And he was appraising the folk art, for some reason, not the furniture.
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#166

doublebungalow2

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Posted Jul 23, 2012 @ 10:22 PM

The Keno brothers sparked a great interest in me to learn more about colonial furniture. Their book (my husband gave me an autographed copy for Christmas) is fabulous. I also bought the audio version to listen to when I clean the house -- husband says I have to be entertained when I clean. I agree!


The British series used to do compilation shows as well, but typically they were more about showcasing special objects, and less about the price.

This is one of my favorite shows. I love the pure love the owners and appraisers show for the objects. What does the dollar value matter? I have stopped watching the US shows -- too much GREED! no respect for the craftsmanship and istory of the items.
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#167

Mystery

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 1:33 AM

PrincessLuceval, in fact my own shoulder had a brief "don't wash me, either!" moment of solidarity with yours. What I love about both Keno brothers is their complete enthusiasm. If I bring in a colonial chair, damn it, I want someone tipping it over and examining the legs! I want drawers pulled out of bureaus, and exclamations of joy over secondary wood!

It does seem to me, sometimes, as if the British Roadshows have more people who are more interested in the information about their objects, than the value. It could be that the shows' editors have preconceptions about their audiences, though.
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#168

bataviaduo

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 11:02 AM

I have been enjoying the compilation shows recently where they show the then and 2012 pricing but it would be interesting to find out if they sold or kept some of these items. We always yell SELL at the TV for some of the items!
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#169

txhorns79

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Posted Jul 24, 2012 @ 9:24 PM

I have been enjoying the compilation shows recently where they show the then and 2012 pricing but it would be interesting to find out if they sold or kept some of these items. We always yell SELL at the TV for some of the items!

I never saw the episodes from fifteen years ago (except for the segments that ended up in the later compilation episodes), so it's all new to me. I thought it was amazing how much some of those prices had dropped since 1997. I know some is tastes changing, some is related to the bad economy driving down demand, but I wonder if part of it is related to the internet flooding markets with items that people initially thought were scarce that turned out not to be in a way that really had not yet happened in 1997.
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#170

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Posted Jul 25, 2012 @ 11:37 AM

I have been enjoying the compilation shows recently where they show the then and 2012 pricing but it would be interesting to find out if they sold or kept some of these items. We always yell SELL at the TV for some of the items!


Finding about what happened to the items sure would add interest to the compliation shows. Also not just finding out if they sold the item, but if the price they got for it was any where near the appraisal.

From my personal point of view, I almost feel like it is a waste of time to show so many items that wind up having the exact same value today as they did 15 years ago. It seems like there are lots and lots of things that fall into this category. I wish they would focus on things that have changed significantly over the years - for better or worse. I think that would make a much more interesing program than showing so many items that are valued the same as they were years ago.

One of the most interesting aspects of the complication shows is seeing what the appraisers looked like 15 years ago!!
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#171

Cgr

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Posted Jul 26, 2012 @ 6:20 AM

I would like to see a few compilations shows about if the item sold. I often think the item should be donated to a museum. It would so depend on how you got the item if you sold it. Some things yes Mr Cgr and I yell 'sell it' and sometimes we don't agree! I often wonder too if for family items if it causes any disagreements about selling of things or you got the $10,000 item and I got the toilet paper holder! So many times when they give a price I think about how many years of college it would pay for. I guess that comes with having 7 more grand-kids that will need college soon!
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#172

LivenLetLive

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Posted Jul 26, 2012 @ 8:09 PM

but I wonder if part of it is related to the internet flooding markets with items that people initially thought were scarce that turned out not to be in a way that really had not yet happened in 1997.


I've been in the antiques business for 28 years, and the answer to your question is yes, the internet has effected the value of many, many items for the exact reason you mention--the widget turned out to be not as rare as once thought.
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#173

Angeltoes

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Posted Jul 27, 2012 @ 7:29 AM

One woman brought in a vase which turned out to be reproductive crap. Value in 1997: $0/ Value in 2012: $0
Can it really be worth nothing? Certainly she could have sold it at a garage sale for a couple of bucks because it was sort of pretty. Heck, she paid $20 for it to start with thinking she'd won the jackpot so there has to be another sucker walking around.

Edited by Angeltoes, Jul 27, 2012 @ 7:32 AM.

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#174

ILNative

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Posted Jul 30, 2012 @ 9:55 AM

I don't understand Ovation. Lately, they've been showing Series 33 of the Antiques Roadshow (UK) and that's been AWESOME, but this morning they just. . .stopped. Now I've been keeping track of which episode come next (because Dish's program descriptions leave everything to be desired) and they have 10 episodes left to show. Did Ovation just buy 20 episodes? Is there some sort of time issue, like these last 10 episodes aren't a year old yet so they can't be shown? It's so frustrating.
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#175

RL1

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Posted Aug 1, 2012 @ 7:34 AM

The funny thing is that the arrows can go either way. I said, "Really? So what if my next door neighbor have something similar to it...would it go either way as well?" This is like the slot theory. Your money could go up, stay the same, or better yet go down.
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#176

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Posted Jan 8, 2013 @ 8:19 PM

The new season started last night in Corpus Christi, Texas. Some gorgeous stuff, as usual - a 1967 Calder painting, an impressive German gun, and a beautifully-carved wooden chest, among others. Also, who doesn't love Babe Ruth memorabilia? The one thing I cannot get over, though, is the big-ticket item. Diego Rivera was a rather famous guy even back in the day, plus the painting was beautiful in its own right. Who on earth hangs an original oil painting behind a door?
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#177

Willow2tree

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Posted Jan 9, 2013 @ 2:21 PM

Oooh, I saw that one, SophiaD! I laughed at him hanging the painting behind a door too! It was beautiful, but being worth between $800,000 and $1 million at auction, I'd have been calling the auction house before I was out of the building. College funds for the kids and grandkids, y'all!
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#178

Cgr

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Posted Jan 9, 2013 @ 5:19 PM

That Diego painting was amazing.

We live about 5 hours from Corpus and applied for tickets but alas the lottery wasn't good for us. I would have loved to have gone. I went in Des Moines back in '99. It was done then by first come first serve for tickets. It was a long wait. My friend was on camera in the opening but I wasn't.
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#179

TV Whore

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Posted Jan 9, 2013 @ 6:18 PM

Here's a trick for tickets that worked real well for me the last time Roadshow was in Orlando.

I had everyone I know fill out a lottery application for tickets online. Three of my friends actually won and received tickets so I got to go, sold two tix on CL (don't tell) and then had two left over tickets as a souvenir!

When I went years ago in Miami somehow Ticketmaster was involved...

I knew that Calder painting would be big money but the Diego Riviera value was stunning. I missed the story about how it ended up behind a door?
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#180

Cgr

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Posted Jan 9, 2013 @ 6:45 PM

you can find the interview here.
http://www.pbs.org/w...dshow/ontv.html
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