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This Old House


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#361

Rickster

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Posted Mar 20, 2013 @ 10:36 AM

I was really surprised by Norm's visit to Daryl Hall's houses on the most recent episode. I would not have expected an old pop star to be so into restoring and replicating old houses like he is. He seemed very knowledgeable.



I was hoping we could see around a door somehow to see where the plasma TV and comfy leather sofas were. I thought the house really looked like a museum and not that liveable. I did notice a panini grill, toaster oven and coffeemaker in the kitchen, plus a stove that looks old, but is actually a hugely expensive French model.
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#362

espie

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Posted Mar 20, 2013 @ 11:09 AM

I love TOH really I do. But sometimes I wish they'd just do a regular house, with features I can afford.

I hear ya. I've kind of backed off from TOH, mostly for this reason, but I still enjoy ATOH which is more down-to-earth and deals in more real-life, house-next-door situations.

I really liked that duplex they did a few years ago, too. Looked like the neighborhood I grew up in, not like the governor's mansion.
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#363

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Posted Apr 7, 2013 @ 11:06 AM

Surprised to hear (well, not really) the grandmother during the Essex cottage finale indicate that she'd never seen the place before that day.

Saw an article somewhere that explained that the cottage is actually adjacent to the homeowners' main home and will be used as a guest space for the main home until the wife's parents decide to move up there permanently from NC. (Sorry - didn't save the article link b/c it was mostly information already given on TOH.) So, that explains the location choice -

The cottage was apparently built in the 30's as an artist's retreat for the wife of John Hammond, Jr. (inventor - radio frequencies, IIRC). Has anyone visited Hammond's Castle? Couldn't remember TOH providing that detail about the history of the home.
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#364

Arnold Robinson

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Posted Apr 7, 2013 @ 5:37 PM

I think I've found the house here. Bing Maps took the pictures in winter, so you can see through the trees, unlike on Google. There appears to be three other houses quite nearby, but I can't tell which one belongs to the homeowners.
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#365

Rickster

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Posted Apr 8, 2013 @ 11:50 AM

I would have sworn that in the first episode they said the children lived several miles away from the house,in the main part of town.
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#366

Zahdii

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 3:45 AM

Didn't realize until today that TWOP had a ToH forum.

 

About the Essex house:  The master bedroom that the HO's will use when they can't use the second story anymore?  It was very narrow, with only a couple of feet of space between the end of the bed and the wall.  If both of the HO's need to use a walker or a wheelchair, how are they going to get around that bed?

 

Next season: Jersey Shore.  It starts later today for me, so I'm a happy camper.

 

An 1880s Shore cottage that's been in the same family for more than 30 years. A home built in 1954 that had last been updated just a couple of years ago. A 1940s house that its owner had finally paid off. Less than a year after Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast, the This Old House TV crew will visit the New Jersey Shore for an eight-part special series that will report on the rebuilding of these three homes, all severely damaged during the storm.

 

This season will be like no other in TOH's history. Instead of featuring start-to-finish renovations, Norm Abram, Richard Trethewey, and the rest of the crew will be documenting the many obstacles that these homeowners face as they scramble to make repairs before the next hurricane season begins. They'll take a real-world look at the thicket of regulatory issues, construction challenges, and financial headaches that have confronted thousands of families whose homes were hard-hit during the 2012 hurricane.


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#367

Cgr

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 5:26 AM

 

 

They'll take a real-world look at the thicket of regulatory issues, construction challenges, and financial headaches that have confronted thousands of families whose homes were hard-hit during the 2012 hurricane.

How about those hard hit by any hurricane?  Having lived through Ike in 2008 I can tell you that many are still not finished or even started rebuilding from that.  I am sure there are other stories out there too.


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#368

Zahdii

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 5:40 AM

How about those hard hit by any hurricane?  Having lived through Ike in 2008 I can tell you that many are still not finished or even started rebuilding from that.  I am sure there are other stories out there too.

 

Agreed, I don't know why they haven't done this before, but at least those who wish ToH would work on more 'regular' houses are going to get their wish.

 


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#369

biakbiak

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 7:12 AM

They did a post-Katrina house in New Orleans in 2007 or 2008.
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#370

Zahdii

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 7:45 AM

They did a post-Katrina house in New Orleans in 2007 or 2008.

 

I must have missed that season.  Did the show build a showcase house or did they keep it more down to earth?  Now that I think of it, they did a season where they remodeled a house that was going to have a rental unit on one of the floors.  I remember that the rental unit was more basic, and the HO's part of the house was dressed up more.  Too many seasons to keep track of, I guess.


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#371

Lola16

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:09 PM

Eons ago, they did a 3 family rental in Jamaica Plains (south of Boston).  I prefer those fix-ups myself.  


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#372

Zahdii

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 1:19 PM

Yes, I think the Jamaica Plains house was what I was thinking of.  I enjoyed it, too.


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#373

Cgr

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Posted Oct 5, 2013 @ 3:13 PM

I think they did a shot gun house pre-Katrina and then maybe one after.  I know this is primarily a New England show but I do enjoy houses from other areas.  There are so many disasters I guess they can't fix them all.


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#374

gregg247

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Posted Oct 23, 2013 @ 3:33 PM

The main thing I remember about the post-Katrina project wasn't the house they were working on, but the secondary storyline, which was the creation of the "musicians village", a neighborhood just outside New Orleans.  I think Harry Connick Jr was involved.  There was this swampland that had been developed and everything had been wiped out by the flooding from Katrina.  Now, they'd laid out all new roads and were building small houses specifically for local jazz musicians.

 

During construction of all these houses, there was a lot of rain, so the streets were always full of water, the yards were deep in water and mud, and everything looked miserable.  They had a final episode "concert" that was a muck-filled mess.  I thought at the time that it was a ridiculous idea to build MORE houses in swampland that had just recently been completely flooded.  What do they think will happen next?!?  The land is a swamp, 10 feet below sea-level!  Stop building there!!!  I'll bet the neighborhood always has that smell of mud and dampness, too.

 

Recently, I read an interview with Norm where he made a reference to the questionable practice of rebuilding homes in places that maybe homes should not have been built in the first place.

 

At least with the Jersey Shore episodes, they're raising all the homes 10'+ in the air.  You have to expect that floods are going to happen; this way, they're at least prepared for them.


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#375

Lola16

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Posted Oct 27, 2013 @ 5:56 PM

Saw an episode last night on the Jersey shore.  One homeowner is replacing her house with a factory prebuild.  Rich took a trip to the factory.  Looks like about 80% of it is done in the factory and then assembly plus roof is done onsite.  We've seen prebuilds before (I think in one of the Carolinas).  It will be interesting to see how much has changed.

 

The doofy guy visited the boardwalk where they were rushing to rebuild before the summer.  Shame that they just had a major fire last month that destroyed several buildings.  


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#376

markm

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Posted Nov 24, 2013 @ 3:50 PM

It was refreshing in this week's episode that the owner of the pre-fab home brought up there were a lot of expensive hidden costs, including paying for a policeman the day the house was delivered.  But of course, Richard made her say that it was all worth it.


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#377

goodtimeprtyboy

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Posted Jan 3, 2014 @ 3:22 PM

Did anyone else notice that the wife on this new season of This Old House looked a little too masculine?


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#378

springtime

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Posted Jan 4, 2014 @ 11:52 AM

The owners of the Arlington house should just purchase another home! (or build one)

 

Too many changes planned!


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#379

Lola16

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Posted Jan 5, 2014 @ 11:42 AM

 

 

The owners of the Arlington house should just purchase another home! (or build one)

I was wondering why they bought it since they aren't really keeping anything about the house.  Maybe they inherited it?  Would seem cheaper to build what they want or find one that is closer to what they want.  This feels more like Extreme Makeover than a renovation.

 

I did like the Ask This Old House episode after.  I learned something new about central air (never had it anywhere I've lived) that too many btu's can sabotage the cooling.

 

And in the episode with Roger Cook (Thanks Catri!), putting down sand and plywood to protect the patio before construction.  Other shows wouldn't take that care.

 

It's such a nice contrast watching Tom Silva carefully remove usable items from the home unlike Josh Templeton on House Crashers who breaks things for the sake of breaking things.


Edited by Lola16, Jan 9, 2014 @ 12:46 AM.

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#380

Catri

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Posted Jan 7, 2014 @ 6:58 PM

Roger Cook


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#381

iwasish

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Posted Jan 8, 2014 @ 11:02 AM

Yeah the central air was interesting.  From what I learned from my installer, unless they oversize the unit, the max temperature you are going to be able to lower your house to is about 20 degrees less than outside temp ( and that is on the hottest days) So if it's 97 outside, it will be nearly impossible to get your house down to 70 degrees.  He also suggested that it is better to turn on the air conditioner when the temps are cooler in anticipation of a heatwave, not to let the house get so hot to start with. 


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#382

TheOverdog

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Posted Jan 8, 2014 @ 12:06 PM

 

From what I learned from my installer, unless they oversize the unit, the max temperature you are going to be able to lower your house to is about 20 degrees less than outside temp ( and that is on the hottest days) So if it's 97 outside, it will be nearly impossible to get your house down to 70 degrees.

 

No that's not true. An oversized central AC will not humidify your house properly, as AC adds humidity as well as cooling. ACs require a certain amount of humidity to work properly, and without that, they will fail more often. That's what he was referring to.  It is not good to buy a dramatically oversized ac for your house beacuse it will be more expensive and break more often.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 How cold your house will get is dependent upon many other factors beyond the A/C like insulation and windows and air loss and things like that, but more than 20 degrees is very possible.  Think about a refrigerator - as long as there is no airflow and heat gain due to the door being open, the ac on a fridge can get the temp from ambient down to freezing. A home ac can do the same thing.

 

 

 

Also, your AC should get your home from ambient (not running no matter the temp outside) to comfortable temps within an hour or maybe two - programmable thermostats like the Nest adjust your AC to be comfortable while you are home but turn it off when you are not because AC is a huge electricity waster.


Edited by TheOverdog, Jan 8, 2014 @ 12:25 PM.

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#383

beeziebee

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Posted Jan 15, 2014 @ 2:47 PM

An oversized central AC will not humidify your house properly, as AC adds humidity as well as cooling.

 

 

Well now I'm completely confused.  I thought the whole principle of how AC works was by REMOVING the humidity from the air in the house, thereby cooling it.


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#384

tanuki

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Posted Jan 23, 2014 @ 9:22 AM

The AC removes humidity in uncomfortably high moisture areas like Florida, but if you have a house the desert like Phoenix  or Vegas your AC will have something to add humidity to the air which increases your comfort level.


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#385

Zahdii

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Posted Jan 23, 2014 @ 9:24 AM

That's why swamp coolers aren't sold east of the Mississippi River.  At least they didn't used to be.


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#386

markm

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Posted Mar 5, 2014 @ 12:48 PM

As someone who has never watched "Deadliest Catch", I don't know what the point was of having one of it's stars appear on last week's This Old House and help with some very basic stuff.  It would have made more sense to have them help him with a project at his own house on Ask This Old House.


Edited by markm, Mar 5, 2014 @ 12:48 PM.

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#387

espie

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Posted Mar 7, 2014 @ 7:17 AM

I had two thoughts during that program, markm: "Who is this guy?", and "Is he ever going to go away?" I enjoy TOH but the one thing that drives me crazy is when they spend too much time on anything other than the project at hand, and the time they wasted when Mr. Fishguy went outside to sneak a smoke infuriated me. It was probably under a minute, but it felt like forever.


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#388

toolazy

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Posted Mar 19, 2014 @ 7:36 PM

I boycotted that episode because I'm not going to enable their gimmicks.  I go to PBS to get away from D-list reality show celebrities.


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#389

goodtimeprtyboy

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Posted Mar 19, 2014 @ 11:49 PM

I boycotted that episode because I'm not going to enable their gimmicks.  I go to PBS to get away from D-list reality show celebrities.

 

 

Same here. I record and watch each episode religiously and for some reason I just couldn't bring myself to watch it.  I never thought I would see the celebrity Bullshit circus make it to a show that has been a staple for most of my life, sad really.


Edited by goodtimeprtyboy, Mar 19, 2014 @ 11:50 PM.

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