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One Day At A Time: Wop on the Key


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#1

emdroberts

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Posted Oct 16, 2004 @ 8:44 PM

Maybe someone can explain to me the behind the scenes politics of the last season. Why was Howard Hesseman only on every other episode and why did Bonnie Franklin leave before the last episode?

Oh, and I always thought it was “Walk on the beat.”
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#2

mbridgii

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Posted Oct 16, 2004 @ 9:19 PM

I don't know of any "politics" that went on. As far as I know (and this is just wild speculation on my part), Hesseman was not necessarily a full cast member, and even Bonnie wasn't being used as much. It seemed like much of the action was occurring over at the Barbara/Mark/Max/sometimes Grandma house anyway.

Besides, it had been a number of years. Many were likely tired, and the original premise (divorced woman raising two kids) had been long over. Schneider had a pilot episode that didn't work, and had left. Julie had been kicked off again, due to that darn love of snow. And once they married off Ann again, there really wasn't much left for the character to do.

The theme song bit: it was. It's kind of an "in joke" (read the thread from the beginning, if it lets you go that far).
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#3

emdroberts

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Posted Oct 16, 2004 @ 9:35 PM

Oh, I did. That’s why I was posting my interpretation. Thanks to the link at the beginning of the thread I now know it’s “Up on your feet”. I like my version better. As for Howard Hesseman, he was in the opening credits every other episode which I thought was kind of weird. I watched the show when it was on E! years ago and I was going through my WKRP love phase too so I was particularly interested in him.
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#4

Josette

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Posted Feb 7, 2005 @ 9:01 AM

CBS is having a reunion special for this show on February 22.
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#5

ontheroof

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Posted Feb 7, 2005 @ 4:04 PM

Just took a look at the photos on the CBS site, and they all look really good. Sure, there's been some surgery, and of course airbrushing, but compare this cast reunion to the reunion of the Happy Days cast -- many of the HD cast looked pretty rough.

Valerie looks good -- perhaps because she's got a bit of weight on her. Mackenzie is no longer a junkie, plus has had some (decent) cosmetic surgery, so she's looking probably the best she's ever looked. Pat Harrington looks like he's aged well, and hasn't bloated up or anything. Bonnie Franklin looks pretty much the same, aside from gaining a few pounds. She doesn't seem to have had much, if any, face work done, and looks natural.

Looking forward to this reunion, and hoping that it spurs some net to start running the old episodes again.
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#6

hannahjane

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Posted Feb 12, 2005 @ 9:45 PM

No supporting cast in the reunion show? Interesting that Mackenzie agreed to do it since she had a shaky relationship with the show because of her substance abuse issues. I would have liked to have seen Glenn Scarpelli on the reunion show too. Pat Harrington looks good.
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#7

kariyaki

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Posted Feb 12, 2005 @ 10:01 PM

Interesting that Mackenzie agreed to do it since she had a shaky relationship with the show because of her substance abuse issues.

It doesn't surprise me that Mackenzie agreed to do the reunion. True, she had issues with the show but they were all problems on HER end. From what I've seen of her in interviews where she talked about her substance abuse problems, she knows she behaved rather badly in those days.

What, no Ron Rifkin in the reunion?
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#8

Josette

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Posted Feb 13, 2005 @ 4:07 AM

No supporting cast in the reunion show?

It looks like they won't be part of the group gathering, but they will have interviews with most of them.

In separate interviews, recurring cast members Richard Masur (David Kane), Shelley Fabares (Francine Webster), Nanette Fabray (Grandma Katherine Romano), Michael Lembeck (Max Horvath) and Glenn Scarpelli (Alex Handris) share their feelings about their time on the show and their characters' relationships with Ann, Barbara and Julie.


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#9

mcmaenza

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Posted Feb 16, 2005 @ 6:54 AM

I really hope the reunion show gets some good ratings, and then it spurs on a release of this show on DVD.
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#10

fernsehen

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Posted Feb 20, 2005 @ 5:24 PM

In the February 25 issue of Entertainment Weekly (with the "Who Will Win?" cover about the Oscars), there's a "TV Q&A" with Bonnie Franklin in connection with the reunion special (CBS, Feb. 22, 9 pm Eastern). It's only one column long, but it has a photo. She still looks much like she did in the '80s.
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#11

valny

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Posted Feb 21, 2005 @ 12:46 PM

Here's an article on the reunion show from today's NY Daily News. The reviewer wasn't too thrilled with it but I'm still looking forward to it despite his reviews.
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#12

sirhcmeister

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Posted Feb 21, 2005 @ 5:41 PM

I thought the lyrics were "wop on your feet" as well.

Norman Lear really did start the trend with "Upsetting" endings. Every second episode would end with someone crying, but then audience clapping at the end. Kind of weird, IMO.
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#13

BewareThePhog

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Posted Feb 21, 2005 @ 11:39 PM

I always thought it was "up on your feet", so I looked up the lyrics. Here's what I found:

This is it. This is it.
This is life, the one you get
So go and have a ball.

This is it. This is it
Straight ahead and rest assured
You can’t be sure at all.

So while you’re here enjoy the view
Keep on doing what you do
So hold on tight we'll muddle through
One day at a time, One day at a time.

So up on your feet. Up on your feet
Somewhere there’s music playing.
Don’t you worry none
We’ll just take it like it comes.

One day at a time, one day at a time.
One day at a time, one day at a time.
One day at a time, one day at a time.
One day at a time, one day at a time.
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#14

espie

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Posted Feb 22, 2005 @ 8:22 AM

He was bland and dull and they had zero chemistry.



Coincidentally, this is exactly how I felt about Richard Masur's character. I thought David was such a zero that I ended up transferring that zero-ness to the actor, and I remember being surprised years later when I saw Masur in some things that really showed what he could do when he had a well-drawn character and lines that were more interesting than "Now, Ann..." or "Come on, Ann..." I'm sorry, Mr. Masur; you are SO not David, and I apologize.

Looking back on this with a now-adult perspective, I wonder if they felt they HAD to give Ann a boyfriend as a pre-emptive strike against any potential rumors that she might be a lesbian. That might have been a little too hot to handle in the 70's.
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#15

muchsarcasm

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Posted Feb 22, 2005 @ 9:43 AM

From that NY Daily News article:

To call [Schneider] comic relief on "One Day at a Time" isn't too far off the mark - even though to suggest that comic relief is needed on a sitcom shows just how unfunny, strident and unmemorable much of this show was.

I think that's fairly accurate. I used to watch it in reruns with my sister but looking back I'm not exactly sure why.
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#16

Sarcastico

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Posted Feb 22, 2005 @ 12:17 PM

You and me both, muchsarcasm. I watched this show a lot, and never, ever enjoyed it. The only possible reason is that it was on just before, or just after, or in between something else that I did like.

Looking back on it, I can't believe the miscasting: Mackenzie Phillips as a sexpot? Valerie Bertinelli as a wallflower? Absolutely unreal.

A bunch of us at work one day several years ago took a vote: who was the Most Annoying Sitcom Queen of the mid-1970s? Bonnie Franklin, Valerie Harper or Linda Lavin? Bonnie won.

That NY Daily News quote sums it up perfectly.
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#17

Magoo

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Posted Feb 22, 2005 @ 7:39 PM

I love the thread title and understood it instantly.

May have to check out the reunion. Guilty pleasure, then and now . . .
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#18

over30patheticgroupie

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 12:28 AM

I always thought the song said "womp on your feet", funny thing is that on the reunion show Mackenzie Phillips said she always thought that too.
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#19

SiameseCatLady

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 1:37 AM

You and me both, muchsarcasm. I watched this show a lot, and never, ever enjoyed it. The only possible reason is that it was on just before, or just after, or in between something else that I did like.

IMHO, it's the high amount of drahhhma (tm Laurie Smith) in most Norman Lear sitcoms that made them not age so well. I watched One Day at a Time when it first aired (yes, I am old, shut up or I'll beat you with my cane) and was a couple of years younger than Barbara, so this was a big fave of mine. It was so modern and topical and actually dealt with sex. The eps where Julie ran off with Chuck were SHOCKING. I can't even really think of something modern to compare it to, but it was a big deal.

Mackenzie Phillips as a sexpot? Valerie Bertinelli as a wallflower?

Actually, Julie was supposed to be a rebel and back in the olden days, wild girls had sex. Barbara wasn't so much a wallflower as a good girl - and sometimes, back in the dark ages, girls who didn't "put out" didn't always have boys beating down their door no matter how cute they were.

Watching the reunion show I realized how ugly their apartment was - even for the 70s - it was hideous!
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#20

Paved Paradise

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 7:35 AM

The reunion show totally ignored the last 4 or 5 years of the show. Talked about Ann's independent. Ignored that she married Howard Hesseman and Barbara married Boyd Gaines. It was weird when they referred to their characters in the first person -- I've never heard an actor do that before, it sounded really affected.
Shelley Fabares looked awful, Nanette Fabray looked quite good -- she must be well into her 80s.
One thing they didn't talk about was how Bonnie Franklin always looked too young for the part -- she never realistically looked like she could be MP's mother.
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#21

ubi

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 8:35 AM

I really hope the reunion show gets some good ratings, and then it spurs on a release of this show on DVD.

Quite frankly, I thought that was why this reunion show was done! I can't say I've ever heard anyone "I loved that show! I wonder what the cast is doing now?".

Norman Lear really did start the trend with "Upsetting" endings. Every second episode would end with someone crying, but then audience clapping at the end. Kind of weird, IMO.

Yeah, that sort of thing always bugged me as well.
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#22

jcsc

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 9:32 AM

The DJs on our local morning show were talking about last night’s reunion show, and one spoke about an interview he did with Mackenzie Phillips a few years ago. He said that she told him that just after she turned 18, Mick Jagger showed up at her door and said he’d been waiting until she was legal so he could do her – so he did.

I liked the show last night. I was just a kid when it was on, but I can’t believe how much I remembered from the clips they showed. Was it really 30 years ago? I loved their apartment when I was a kid too, couldn’t wait until I grew up and got one like it. Now – not so much… Can’t remember this though - what was Alex’s relationship to the family? Ann’s nephew?

Wow, what happened to Shelley Fabares?

What, no Ron Rifkin in the reunion?


Who did Ron Rifkin play?
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#23

mcmaenza

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 9:49 AM

Well, here in ACC country, the Tarheels played NC State - so the show got bumped to 3:07am this morning. Grrrrr. Good thing the DVR was set to record it - but then the stupid local network started it at 3am (I watched the start this morning and it was already into the show - double GRRRRRRR!). I am looking forward to watching what was recorded later today.

I'm forty, so I was just 10 years old when the show debuted late in 1975. I remember how shocking some of the topics were for TV at the time. I remember I was fascinated because, having no sisters, there was lots of stuff discussed that was not discussed in our home. I found the show fascinating. And I had a huge crush on Valerie Bertinelli/Barbara Cooper.

Is the show dated? Sure it is. How would teens of 2005 relate to the teen issues of 1975 (as Valerie asked on the special)? It would be interesting to see.

I do hope this show starts to come out DVD soon. I'd be right in line to pick it up the day it comes out. Given that other Norman Lear shows are doing well (All In the Family, Good Times), I would expect this one to come too soon (along with Maude - where's the Maude DVDs?).
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#24

ubi

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 10:22 AM

Can’t remember this though - what was Alex’s relationship to the family? Ann’s nephew?

He was the relative-brought-in-to-boost-sagging-ratings kind of relative.
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#25

Sarcastico

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 10:32 AM

Actually, Julie was supposed to be a rebel and back in the olden days, wild girls had sex. Barbara wasn't so much a wallflower as a good girl - and sometimes, back in the dark ages, girls who didn't "put out" didn't always have boys beating down their door no matter how cute they were.


I guess that's true, SCL. I'm looking back from the distance of 30 years; at the time, the casting didn't seem so odd. Mackenzie wasn't so much of a sexpot as an "out-of-control" teen; today, Julie and Ann would be on Maury Povich or Rikki Lake!
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#26

M. Darcy

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 11:37 AM

Oh yeah, I forgot about Howard Hessman.

I don't think Alex wasn't even a relative. Wasn't he Nick (Ron Rifkin's character - one of Ann's boyfriends)'s son that moved in with Ann after Nick died or something? Or am I remembering wrong.
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#27

teriweaver

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 12:24 PM

I haven't seen the show yet (yes, I taped it and Yes, I am a geek) But in response to the questions about Shelley Fabares...she had a liver transplant about a year ago so if she didn't look great that may have something to do with it.

Edited by teriweaver, Feb 23, 2005 @ 12:25 PM.

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#28

stinkymcgee

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 12:56 PM

Bonnie Franklin *could've* been M.P.'s mother, but she would've been Very Young Indeed (B.F. born January 1944, M.P. born November 1959).

I was surprised to learn on the visit to IMDB which gave me the answer above, that Valerie Bertinelli is only five months younger than Mackenzie. Yow. Growing up with Papa John definitely takes its toll.
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#29

TonyaR1968

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 2:46 PM

Shelley Fabares is also 62 years old and looked like Gwen Stefani back in The Return to Saturn era. Spiky pink and blonde hair. Not a good look, for Gwen at age 30 and definitely not for Shelley at age 62.

Edited by TonyaR1968, Feb 23, 2005 @ 3:37 PM.

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#30

over30patheticgroupie

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Posted Feb 23, 2005 @ 4:02 PM

The voiceover of Julie's character while they were showing newspaper clippings of Mackenzie's real life drug problems was so cheezy. The show looked like it was one of those Lifetime channel biographies.
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