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#31

Endeavour

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Posted Jan 13, 2004 @ 12:48 PM

I thought maybe being on the show would help in getting a decent house, because the realtor wouldn't want to look bad on tv.
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#32

jerseydevil

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Posted Jan 13, 2004 @ 4:16 PM

The person who really benefits is the realtor, because he/she gets free advertising. Maybe the show pays the realtor's commision on the chosen house, and lowers the price by that same amount. These are not big budget shows.
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#33

ChillinTheMost

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Posted Jan 20, 2004 @ 9:12 AM

Did anyone see the recent [or recently rerun] episode about the guy in Florida? The single father, son's name was Hammond, or something, and he had two boats?

After the first home, I thought, "And it goes up from here?!?!?!" Damn that place was gorgeous!!!

But, it really didn't make sense for him to get that one, since it wasn't on the water.

The one he did get was nice even before he fixed it up!!!

And there was one last night at 11pm. The artsy/antique-y couple. She was pregnant, he had a bunch of motorcycles... I thought they did a good job on the place they bought [a fixer-upper], but their color choices weren't really to my tastes. I thought the outside looked better [the colors] before they changed them and most of the inside colors, too.
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#34

AliLou

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Posted Jan 23, 2004 @ 6:03 PM

Heh. I was just wondering the other day what's in it for the HOs. At least on design shows, they get some free stuff, even if it's crappy stuff. I really don't know why people looking for houses would put themselves to the trouble of having cameras along for no good reason. Maybe they get paid a small amount?


I have wondered this forever, what do they get? I am thinking it's probably a few thousand for some rennovations because I have never seen anyone just move in and not fix something. I would love someone if they can answer what the homeowners get.
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#35

TexasTallGal

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 12:06 AM

Or maybe they get help getting their homes redone for the they've lived here for four months and look what they've done part of the show? I've lived in my new home for eight months now and I'm just beginning to accomplish what seems to get done in two months on this show.
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#36

Irlandesa

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 2:13 AM

I've never bought a house so I'm not sure what the HO's could get. Are realtor fees expensive? Perhaps in exchange for the publicity, the agents waive those fees. Or the show helps with closing costs...whatever they might be.
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#37

DawnPetters

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 9:35 AM

Are realtor fees expensive?


They can be. The realtor usually gets paid from 1% to 6% of the selling price depending on the agent. In high cost areas such as New York City or San Francisco this means the realtor makes a nice amount of money even if they charge only 1 or 2 percent.
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#38

TexasTallGal

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 9:46 AM

Here in Texas (at least the parts I've lived in) they get 6% but the seller usually pays the realtor.
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#39

queasy

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 10:13 AM

Did anyone see the recent [or recently rerun] episode about the guy in Florida? The single father, son's name was Hammond, or something, and he had two boats?...The one he did get was nice even before he fixed it up!!!

Yeah, I loved the house he picked, too. It was a little run down but had great style. Being right on the waterway didn't hurt, either. I like that the show is talking more about cost, too. Just so my jaw can get some exercise from all the dropping.

The realtor in Dallas who was moving back to his old neighborhood was interesting. It's not the house I would have picked, but it worked for him. I liked the townhouse that he sold, too.

Did anyone see Double Agents on Friday with the family who had seven kids? The parents only seemed to be in their early thirties, too. They kept looking at these huge, 6000 sf houses, but I kept thinking, "Too small, too small." As it was, they only ended up with four bedrooms.

Edited by queasy, Jan 24, 2004 @ 10:16 AM.

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#40

jerseydevil

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Posted Jan 24, 2004 @ 11:28 AM

Queasy, I did see that one - made me wonder what that man did for a living that he could afford a 6 to 800,000 dollar house and seven children. Maybe we should take this over to the Double Agents thread.
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#41

greybear

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Posted Jan 25, 2004 @ 7:14 PM

Here in Austin TX, common practice is for the buying and selling agents to evenly divide a 6% commission paid by the seller. During economic times like this when houses are sitting vacant for months [even years] on end, it's all negotiable. My realtor told me at a holiday party that selling agents are routinely taking 2% or less just to get the property sold. It sure beats 0%!
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#42

TexasTallGal

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Posted Jan 25, 2004 @ 11:23 PM

Here too, the 6% commission is split by the two agents but it's still 6% to the seller. That's a lot of money. I was able to pay just 3% when I sold my last house because I was a FSBO and paid 3% to the buyer's agent.

ETA, do you think the HOs go on this show just to be on TV? I think it would be kind of fun. Since you'd already be house hunting, why not do it on TV? It's not like you have to put up with Hild* or anything.

Edited by TexasTallGal, Jan 26, 2004 @ 9:58 AM.

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#43

ChillinTheMost

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Posted Jan 26, 2004 @ 2:49 PM

What is Double Agents? Another house hunting show?

I'll go check out that thread [so, please, don't fuss too much with me, TWoP PTB], but the reason I am also asking here is that if that show, or any others, are about house hunting and looking at lots of houses, could y'all please let me know what they are and what channels they are on and days/times??? I love these shows so much more than decorating shows, but don't know which is which - until they pull out the purple paint. Thanks!

Sigh. Well, I checked out that thread and it seems a perfect show for me: lots of houses and in my own area, too, but unfortunately, I'm at work when that thread said the show was on. Damn this whole self-sufficiency crap!!! Somebody find me a rich husband!!!

Edited by ChillinTheMost, Jan 26, 2004 @ 3:42 PM.

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#44

Arabella

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Posted Jan 26, 2004 @ 4:05 PM

My husband and I went apartment shopping over the weekend. I went from room to room, each time saying in a voice attempting to mimic the children's day care lady (my "favorite" episode), "Wow, this is so niiiiiiiiice." Once I even got to say, "Wow, I'm not sure I like this caaaaarrpet." It took a sharp jab in the ribs from my husband to get me to stop. He didn't think the leasing agents got what I was doing, but I think they did.
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#45

jkingstl

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Posted Jan 26, 2004 @ 4:25 PM

"Wow, this is so niiiiiiiiice."


But was it nice enough for the chuldrin?

Hee

That episode is one of my favorites. The other one that cracks me up is the one with the hat wearing realtor lady with the strange accent, that says "You have to kiss a lot of frogs..." When mr jrkstl and myself were house hunting, we'd say that after all of the craptastic houses we looked at. Maybe I need to go look at some open houses so I can talk about how "niiice" and "spaceeous" the rooms are. Good times.
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#46

selkie

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Posted Jan 26, 2004 @ 7:58 PM

Chillin' if you get BBCAmerica, check out Escape to the Country: non-London house porn, sometimes at very reasonable prices even with the exchange rate. Half an hour like HH, but a fairly high percentage of the prospective HOs don't buy one of the houses the agent shows.
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#47

ChillinTheMost

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 1:03 PM

Chillin' if you get BBCAmerica, check out Escape to the Country: non-London house porn, sometimes at very reasonable prices even with the exchange rate. Half an hour like HH, but a fairly high percentage of the prospective HOs don't buy one of the houses the agent shows.


Porn? House hunting AND porn! I gotta see that show!!! I think I can even get my boyfriend to pay attention to this one!

Hee. The worse thing is, I haven't a clue what you meant to type! [and you did mean to type something different, didn't you?]

But I get BBCAmerica, so I'll look for it!
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#48

isiscloud

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 1:58 PM

Or maybe they get help getting their homes redone for the they've lived here for four months and look what they've done part of the show? I've lived in my new home for eight months now and I'm just beginning to accomplish what seems to get done in two months on this show.

I've never understood this part of the show because my husband and I have been in our townhouse for 6 1/2 years and we haven't completed a lot of decorating. Just trying to come to a decision on paint is a huge project!

Closing takes at least one month, doesn't it? It took us about a month & a half.

I Love This Show...my husband and I laugh at the music though. pica, picaaa
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#49

selkie

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 5:35 PM

Term I accidentally brought from another board. House porn- looking at pictures and videos of pretty, pretty houses in the same way others would look at pictures of scantily and not so clad people. If it's drooling over a beautiful kitchen, a living room with amazing decor, or an incredibly detailed craftsman staircase, you're moving into house porn territory.
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#50

DawnPetters

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 6:08 PM

Two nights ago I saw an episode of HH and it was in New York. A single woman was looking for an apartment to renovate. I liked the apartment she picked and it had a wonderful terrace but I did not catch the price. Is anyone familiar with this episode and do you know how much she spent on her new home. Homes are not cheap in New York City.

Edited by DawnPetters, Jan 28, 2004 @ 6:13 PM.

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#51

greybear

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 6:13 PM

DawnPetters, this episode is a rerun. Scroll back to the posts that start on Oct 16 to see our discussion and our guesses about the price.
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#52

DawnPetters

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 6:23 PM

Thank you. $600,000 or $650,000 isn't inexpensive but it was less than I felt it might be. I was guessing $900,000 or more.
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#53

greybear

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 7:12 PM

You could be right. There are probably some comps online at a real estate site, but I'm not motivated enough to look for them.
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#54

Hairymango

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Posted Jan 28, 2004 @ 10:16 PM

I just saw that Manhattan brownstone episode for the first time and was curious about the price as well. I'm interested in anything and everything being bought in NY and prices would be nice (Double Agents lets us know a ballpark figure).

Although I like the work the woman did on her place, complete with ceiling raises and transoms, I didn't understand why she chose the light wood kitchen cabinets. I think a darker cherry would have fit the elegant surroundings much better. I also think the step up to the dining room spells disaster. But hey, I'd take it as is, if she were selling and I were rich and buying.

Edited by Hairymango, Jan 28, 2004 @ 10:19 PM.

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#55

ReadySpaghetti

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Posted Jan 30, 2004 @ 11:47 AM

Just found this thread- what a great discovery! My husband and I love this show for reasons other than I've seen in the past 19 pages- we love to guess where in So Cal the houses are. We lived in LA-area until a few years back, so while watching the show we go back and forth between asking the popular "how can they afford this?" to the more mundane "Is that Pasadena? Redondo? Santa Monica?" We argue companionably for the half hour and wait eagerly for the credits to see where the realtor is located. We're very unhappy when it's Remax or an online company not associated with a neighborhood. I also find it very odd that the show is so mysterious about where in LA the houses are. When they visit other cities, they talk about town locations and distance from center city. But they seem to go out of their way to hide that information for the So Cal shows.
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#56

sammygeorge

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Posted Feb 1, 2004 @ 9:45 AM

I just saw that Manhattan brownstone episode for the first time and was curious about the price as well.


I love HH but the one thing I don't like is they never talk about the price (whether listing price or price paid) Now that they're doing the competitive ending (will they choose house 1, 2 0r 3??) they sometimes mention house 2 is 20% more than house 1 or something to that effect, but they still don't talk figures. I want figures!
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#57

ally170

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Posted Feb 1, 2004 @ 10:42 AM

I so agree! I want to know what these houses cost.

ReadySpaghetti, you may be able to answer this considering you lived in the LA area. I've noticed most of the homes they show are empty. My husband and I have bought three homes in the past eleven years, but we always needed to sell the current home to get the money for the next home. Our offers were always made contingent to selling the home we were living in currently.

I never hear anyone speak of contingent offers on this show. How can people afford to move out of a home completely and buy another if they haven't sold the current one? Just curious.
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#58

jerseydevil

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Posted Feb 1, 2004 @ 4:19 PM

The majority of the people on this show have been first-time buyers, or people who are relocating and have already moved from or sold their former homes, or at least in the episodes I've seen. Most of them seemed to have been renting houses and townhomes, as opposed to apartments.
I must admit, I've always wondered how it is that so many of the properties being shown are vacant. We're in our second home, and through both house-hunts, I've only been shown one vacant property. It was owned by a corporation, who relocated the employee who had been living in it.

Edited by jerseydevil, Feb 1, 2004 @ 4:21 PM.

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#59

ReadySpaghetti

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Posted Feb 4, 2004 @ 10:38 AM

In response to why so many houses are shown empty...

I never even heard of a contingency clause until we left LA. It is such a seller's market that to suggest any kind of clause would probably eliminate you. There's no way a potential seller would agree to tie up his or her house while you looked for a buyer for your own. When we sold our place, the buyer offered full price because she'd lost out on at least two or three other places. A lot of the closings happen real fast too- I think we closed about a month after accepting the offer. I don't think it's uncommon for families to buy their next house and move into it before offering their original house for sale. The market is so hot you're probably not going to have to carry two mortgages for very long- could be less than a week! (That's what happened with us.)

Just some thoughts from a former LA'er...
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#60

ally170

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Posted Feb 4, 2004 @ 7:21 PM

Thanks ReadySpaghetti! I've been a midwesterner (Chicago and the surrounding suburbs) my entire life and I can't imagine being able to sell a home that quickly. My husband and I put way too much money into remodeling our second home and it took us about three months to sell it.

Also, how much do most of those homes in the LA area sell for? I know it's quite pricey there and I often wonder how those people can afford it.
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