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Dinner for Five


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#1

tortuga

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Posted Feb 3, 2004 @ 2:45 PM

I finally got to see the "Pieces of April" cast show. It was really sad how they were calling it the best work of their lives and now, several months later, I know it came out to mediocre reviews and bad box office.

It's official: Katie Holmes is the luckiest sonofabitch in Hollywood. That, or she sold her soul to the devil.

#2

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Posted Feb 3, 2004 @ 4:52 PM

Didn't Patricia Clarkson get nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her work in Pieces of April? Personally I thought she did better work in Station Agent this year, but I don't get to choose.

Total agreement with you on the KH lucky thing - I think I posted something like that when this episode first aired.

#3

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Posted Feb 3, 2004 @ 5:25 PM

Yes, Patricia Clarkson got nominated for Pieces of April but I am just happy she got nominated because I love her.

#4

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Posted Feb 4, 2004 @ 7:48 AM

I forgot about Patricia Clarkson being nominated. Okay, I take that part back. But Katie Holmes? The devil. You could totally see the envy in Favreau's eyes.

#5

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Posted Feb 9, 2004 @ 11:42 PM

Saw my first full ep tonite. My love for Rory Cochrane knows no bounds. I thought he was hilarious when Vince Vaughn was hounding him to tell a story - Vince basically told the story for him then forced Rory to recount it. But as someone who recently quit smoking (again and hopefully for good), I really wanted a cigarette so badly after watching them smoke for a half hour. Mmmmmm nicotine.

#6

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Posted Feb 10, 2004 @ 12:52 AM

I loved the episode with the cast of Elf. James Caan was practically infatuated with Will Ferrell. Talking about Night at the Roxbury:

WF: Some people say it shouldn't have been made into a movie.
JC: (pointing from across the table) Loved it...I was the first on line.

I've been a JC fan since I was a kid and I thought it was great how the tough guy had such a soft spot (and respect) for the funny guy. And much deserved respect at that, he was great in Elf.

The worst part about the show is Favreau. I know it's his brainchild, but he is so full of himself, and I have seen him hog an otherwise interesting conversation.

But I love the show, so I can't be all that critical.

#7

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Posted Feb 10, 2004 @ 1:24 AM

I thought he was hilarious when Vince Vaughn was hounding him to tell a story - Vince basically told the story for him then forced Rory to recount it.


I loved that too, mainly because at first RC had this look like he had absolutely no idea what the hell Vince was talking about and then as he finally tells the story it turns out that Vince was right. And the story was so random that he clearly couldn't just have forgotten about it before Vince reminded him of it.

I really want to see the "political" discussion and what Brian Cox said about America.

I also laughed when Brian Cox was like "Hey, we have been in the same movie."

#8

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Posted Apr 9, 2004 @ 10:59 PM

Double post because it has been two months and in honor of the new season.

I really think Ron Livingston should be the new host or at least a regular because that man cracks me up. "The Carter shit kills."

Faision Love doesn't believe that ships were capable of trans-atlantic journeys in the 18th century? The man needs to take a history class or two.

Edited by biakbiak, Apr 9, 2004 @ 11:13 PM.


#9

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Posted Apr 10, 2004 @ 1:53 PM

I thought what FL was saying was that if ships were used to transport slaves, some of those ships should still be around somewhere. The real point of his argument, if I understood him properly, was that black people were native to America and therefore didn't need to be brought over for slavery to occur.

Slavery aside, what a hilarious episode! Poor Gina Gershon. From All about Eveto Showgirls.

#10

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Posted Apr 10, 2004 @ 2:26 PM

I like the way Ron Livingston phrased it about Showgirls: "When did you know?"

It reminded me of a conversation from the last episode to feature Faison Love, where the actors talked about whether they feel confidence that they're making a good movie, or if the knowledge that it's going to suck kicks in pretty early. Michael Rapaport claimed to have a strong track record of predicting that the final product would suck early into shooting.

I like that Faison continued to alienate and insult directors. His first appearance was hilarious, from his dissing of Spike Lee, John Singleton and others, and his impression of Ice Cube as director: "Move the thing! Yo, moo da thing!" So it was fun to see him slamming Torque and mocking music video directors: "Bentley, ass, cut. Bentley, ass, cut. All right, get the n***a with the gold chains."

#11

biakbiak

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Posted Apr 10, 2004 @ 2:44 PM

I thought what FL was saying was that if ships were used to transport slaves, some of those ships should still be around somewhere


No he stated that they didn't have the ability to make ships. And while that may have been the point of his argument it remains a stupid and ahistorical argument. Not to mention there are ships from that period that were used as slave ships he just needs to go to the Ivory Coast.

So it was fun to see him slamming Torque and mocking music video directors: "Bentley, ass, cut. Bentley, ass, cut. All right, get the n***a with the gold chains."


Yeah that cracked me up, even though it was a just another version of the last time he was on when he said all people who were in those movies wanted to know was where their Bentley and their gun was.

#12

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Posted Apr 10, 2004 @ 6:25 PM

It was part of a comedy act. I don't know if Faizon actually believes it, but it makes for a funny joke - research would just ruin it. Of course, it would have been good if he said something like "f--k it, I don't know".

I was concerned that he might have been a bit too much, but once we got past this bit, he was cool. Liked the slamming on "Torque" - I wonder if he has thoughts on that craptacular "The Big House" he's in. Or on "The Parent Hood" that he appeared on. I mean if you have such scorn for crap directors, why continue to appear in crap? At a certain point, you have to point the finger at yourself.

#13

rayray

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Posted Apr 12, 2004 @ 6:45 PM

The best part of the show was when Dennis Farina said that Barney Miller was the best description of cops. Also, I agree with mbridgii on Faison's choice of movies.

#14

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Posted May 17, 2004 @ 9:23 PM

Anyone else watch the most recent installment and kind of feel like Ernie Hudson should have stuck to bottled water? Dude was blithering.

#15

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Posted May 18, 2004 @ 10:06 AM

I saw it, and yeah, boy. Maybe he was star-struck over sharing cigars with Danson?

But I was shocked when he said he was 58, older than Teddy boy. I'd've guessed 10 years younger.

#16

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Posted May 18, 2004 @ 11:48 AM

Though I am kind of glad he didn't because it was the only thing interesting about that episode.

I too was shocked that he was older than Ted.

#17

iMissEthan

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Posted May 18, 2004 @ 11:55 AM

I missed this episode. Weren't they airing Fridays at 8, rerunning Mondays? I checked Friday and it wasn't on, so I thought the series was over again.

#18

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Posted May 18, 2004 @ 11:58 AM

I don't know what time it was on because I have a season pass for it on my TIVO but it definitely aired on Friday. THough you really didn't miss anything.

#19

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Posted May 22, 2004 @ 12:42 AM

Just saw the episode with Luis Guzman, Barry Pepper, Jennifer Espisito and Stephen Dorff.

It ended with me being even more secure in the knowledge that Stephen Dorff is a big old tool. He looked so out of place and seemed to be searching for something, anything, to talk about. But I do love me some Luis. That man is funny.

#20

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Posted May 22, 2004 @ 12:58 AM

It ended with me being even more secure in the knowledge that Stephen Dorff is a big old tool.


That he is. I swear he told like two stories but he managed to drop more names than anyone. I hope he isn't actually friends with Owen Wilson. I loved when Jon and Jennifer both excused him of getting off on photoshoots.

Luis was great, I don't think I realized how short his arms were.

#21

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Posted May 23, 2004 @ 10:45 AM

I just wanna know: Is Barry Pepper auditioning for his own talk show? He was like Torquemada with the questions! Did anyone else pick up a little tension when he let slip John Travolta's $20 million dollar paycheck for "Battlefield Earth"? It seemed like there was some more he wanted to bitch about but stopped himself. I thought JT did that role for free.

See, I thought Stephen Dorf came off better than my memories of him. I thought he was a tool before this show, and now I think he's not that toolish. I do think that Pay-per-view should start airing "John Walters dishes the Oscars". I'd pay $20 bucks to see that. Waaay better the Plastic Rivers women.

Luis Guzman who's credit list completely amazes me. He and Katie Holmes are on my list of "People who must have a deal with the Devil."

ETA: I don't think Favreau mentioned "Rudy". I wonder if Kevin Smith's harrassment has started to sink in.

Edited by tortuga, May 23, 2004 @ 10:47 AM.


#22

TheRealJanBrady

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Posted May 29, 2004 @ 11:41 AM

iMissEthan, the show's now on Fridays at 10.

I felt kinda bad for Dorff. Yeah, I think he's toolish, but everyone was giving him such shit to his face and he clearly hasn't been making the caliber of movies as the rest of them (though I don't think Jennifer Esposito is any great talent and she seemed to be riding her appearance in Summer of Sam really hard).

I also felt kinda bad for Hudson. Another sitch where everyone at the table had current--or-huge--careers, and no matter what, at 58, he's still the Ghostbusters guy. God, Ted Danson looks horrrrrrible.

I love this show, but I also used to love Favreau, and the more I watch it--or maybe it's the more eps with Kevin Smith I see?--the more he irks me. In last night's ep, with Tracy Ullman, Peter Dinklage, etc., he kept bringing up Miramax and Swingers and I was like, OY! Give it a rest, man! I also thought it was awesome that Tracy Ullman threw the "I'm moving to Canada" thing in Alec Baldwin's face. Through his whole rant about actors and politics, I kept wanting someone to ask, "What makes actors' opinions so damned special and important?" and the smirk they kept cutting to on Favreau's face made me wonder whether he was thinking the same thing.

#23

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Posted May 29, 2004 @ 2:34 PM

"What makes actors' opinions so damned special and important?"


That was the point of Alec's rant. It's not that actors' opinions are special but as citizens of this country they have a right to speak out. I also thought he had a good point that if he was speaking out against Lieberman and others who use election years to attack Hollywood no one would have a problem with it. Or if he was supporting the the status quo, Bruce Willis doesn't get crap for talking in interviews how the war in Iraq was a great idea and W. is doing a good job.

And it was awesome that she mentioned the leave the country because that was picked up from a german publication that never did an interview with Alec or Kim, who the piece was was actually written about, and was never confirmed by the publication.

Is Carrie Fischer back on the drugs because she seemed much more scattered than usual.

Edited by biakbiak, May 29, 2004 @ 2:36 PM.


#24

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Posted May 29, 2004 @ 7:27 PM

Carrie seemed her regular, scattered self to me. She also seemed to be wearing the same blouse that she wore on a previous appearance. I just know I've seen that ill-fitting garment on her someplace else.

I didn't really like this week's episode. Alec Baldwin can be an interesting guy, but he seemed a bit out of sorts there. Maybe he felt a little like he was too big for the room, but then realized that he wasn't really.

Even he admitted that the career isn't exactly where it used to be - that would have been an interesting conversation. But we had to listen to end BS conversations about who-knows-what. Besides, it's not that Alec doesn't have a right to speak his mind. It's just that he only is able to get national coverage because he is a celebrity. No matter how much the average person might know, he/she is not going to get that kind of coverage. Even if I agree with him, I don't want to hear from him or Bruce Willis, unless it is related to their work.

Favreau really does need to let go of the "Swingers" references. I realize that is his claim to filmmaking, but it's as though it is the only thing on the resume. When Kevin "shut up already, damn" Smith calls you out on it, it's time for new material.

#25

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Posted May 30, 2004 @ 12:33 AM

Another sitch where everyone at the table had current--or-huge--careers, and no matter what, at 58, he's still the Ghostbusters guy.


I was a teenager when Ghostbusters came out and for the longest time he was that guy but now he is Warden Glynn...forever and always.

I enjoyed the Alec Baldwin episode. I thought he was refreshing and honest. Carrie Fisher always cracks me up. She is a nut but also very down to earth and, for lack of a better word, normal to me. Her story about Eddie Fisher's face lifts making him look Asian cracked me up.

huh. I never noticed that Favreau constantly talks about Swingers. I mean, I realize that he mentions it but it always seems relevent to the topic at hand so it doesn't seem desperate to me.

#26

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Posted May 30, 2004 @ 7:26 AM

It's relevant because it is a movie, but no matter what the industry-related topic, there seems to be a "Swingers" story. I'm not saying he shouldn't mention it again, but it has reached drinking-game status. The key phrase to look for is "When we were making 'Swingers'..."

I still don't care about Alec Baldwin's politics, but he was interesting. There was something about this grouping that didn't seem all that comfortable, though. Baldwin didn't seem as comfortable being there as one might imagine, given interviews he's done elsewhere.

If one happened to see "Oz", that is the dominant image of Ernie Hudson; otherwise, he is "Ghostbusters" guy. Meanwhile, Ted Danson is still Sam Malone to many who haven't moved on. I don't think Ernie has lost any more work due to the GB role. It's more a function of not enough parts for black actors - particularly in that age group - even though I don't think 58 when I see Hudson.

#27

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Posted May 30, 2004 @ 1:25 PM

I admit, I've never watched Oz--I am a wuss and can't handle it--but I have seen Hudson in other roles. I think the reason I see Hudson as Ghostbusters guy and Ted Danson as Ted Danson is that Danson is much more a "star" in the public eye. Not that that's a good thing, but he's just more visible as a personality.

Aside from talking about Swingers, I've noticed that recently Favreau references "Zooey," as in Deschanel, from Elf, in about every episode. I don't know if he's crushing on her or just thinks she gives him indie cred or what, but she's worth adding to the Dinner for Five drinking game. (I do think she's awesome, so maybe I'd be mentioning her all the time, too.)


mbridgii, I know exactly what you mean about Alec Baldwin. I really liked how he acknowledged that his career had had peaks and valleys, and appreciated his honesty, and I liked how devoted he was to a good part and doing stage work and not just being a "star." Something about the political conversation bothered me, though. It's not bad that he takes politics seriously, but that doesn't mean I want him to be my congressperson or governor.

Carrie Fisher's a little crazy, but she does crack me up.

Edited by TheRealJanBrady, May 30, 2004 @ 1:30 PM.


#28

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Posted Jun 1, 2004 @ 12:48 PM

I'm pretty sure Carrie Fisher wore that shirt to The Daily Show.

If Alec Baldwin got more jobs where he gets to do funny voices, I would spend all my money on him. It never gets old for me. Maybe 'cause I'm 12. (And also, that dessert he was eating looked so good, it totally made me raid my fridge.) Interesting -- his take on his career as being reactive: It's not how many calls you get, it's who's calling you. (Marty Scorcese v. Larry Scorcese --hee!). He seemed kind of struck by actors needing to direct, produce, or write, as if taking more charge of one's show biz career was an anomaly. I'd have thought that a guy like AB would have his own production company so he wasn't always waiting by the phone, but that didn't seem to occur to him. Or am I misreading his comments?

I was amused at the little collective dig to Tracy Ullman that Britons aren't necessarily as good at American accents as they think they are.

I love Peter Dinklage. I enjoyed how everybody else at the table was quite manifestly envious of The Station Agent. Even Favreau tried to mask it (unsuccessfully) with his "Oh yeah, I had to hire him for Elf, 'cause I'm the man" shtick.

#29

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Posted Jun 5, 2004 @ 10:08 AM

OK, on the surface, an episode featuring Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLuise, Charles Durning, and Charles Nelson Reilly doesn't exactly scream "watch this". However, I went into this week's episode thinking that it would be surprisingly good. I mean, you have four actors who have known each other forever and must have an infinite number of stories to tell about the industry, right?

So how was it the most boring episode I've ever seen? Maybe they didn't want to tell the really juicy stories, so they proceeded to bore the living crap out of the few remaining people that sat through to the end.

Where were the Hollywood stories? Endless minutes on World War II? Thank you for serving your country, Mr. Durning, but it was obvious that even he was bored with that line of questioning. These people have made countless movies, yet the extended segment on "All Dogs Go To Heaven" was a waste of time.

The biggest drain was CNR. Has he even made a film? The only credits that I saw pop up with his name were old TV shows that weren't popular ever (except for "Match Game", but that's hardly acting).

I'm thinking that some others from the Reynolds camp would have been much more interesting. Say, for example, Hal Needham, Jerry Reed, Ned Beatty, Ossie Davis. Many of the people from "Evening Shade" would have been interesting.

No wonder they didn't promote this one during the week. Next week looks much more promising (Delroy Lindo, Colin Quinn, Danny Aiello, and John Waters). Though I have to look at Quinn as the CNR of this quartet.

#30

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Posted Jun 5, 2004 @ 3:25 PM

Yeah, I was surprised by how boring this show was as well. Though I always go back and forth on whether Burt Reynolds is a dick or not and what I decided last night is regardless he is a very good friend. I found most of the WWII discussion boring, but I thought it was endearing how much he talked up CD.